Poetry Review-“Coping Circles” by Glen Binger: A Bittersweet Romp Across Gallows, Through Open Windows, Over Bridge Railings, and Along the Edge of a Razor Blade

Glen Binger, Jersey poet and author of “Thing’s You Don’t Know”, “ENJoy: Stories by the Sea”, and others, slams readers in the face and in the gut with a handful-sized helping of poetry this time in the form of semi-autobiographical splurge “Coping Circles”.

glen

“Coping Circles” is a hand-sized booklet of twenty-one  single-page or two-page length poems, each one depicting an episode of death, loss, grief, or as the title suggests “coping”. They can be read from the perspective of one person’s mind, or each poem coming from a tragic tale of woe belonging to one individual random wanderluster.

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Glen’s theme this time around is much different than what he usually sifts out into the world; it’s darker and heavy, and consequentially is sometimes hard to get through. That’s not to say his words aren’t good, they are VERY good. Poetry is supposed to invoke emotion, and it doesn’t always have to be happy, sunny, uplifting, or optimistic. I read this little book in one sitting, because I felt that I should, not just because I wanted to. Something pulled me to the end, despite each of the poem’s own daggers sticking itself in me with each turn of a page. They dug in and twisted, reminding me of all the things I’ve taken for granted over the years, whether it be family members, woman I’ve fallen in love with, including my fiancé, pets I’ve taken care of and every single material possession I’ve pocketed along the way in life thus far. I don’t count myself as being ungrateful for anything in life, but the poems in “Coping Circles” reinforced my love and my need to hold on to everyone I keep close. Reading “Coping Circles” eventually began to feel trance-like, as if I were meditating in deep thought. I was reminded of a walking-simulator game called Dear Esther that I fell in love with years ago, that I played a hundred times just to hear the voice of the narrator while listening to the haunting morose, perfect score of the soundtrack. I began to read each of these poems in the voice of that narrator, and had to take a breather several times just to remind myself I wasn’t reading the thoughts of twenty-one cursed, depressed and burdened-by-loss people. But by the end, I was supremely grateful for the journey taken. It’ll probably be a long time before I open this book again, it’s one of those “one and done” deals, but in the best of ways. The poems inside all bring home a reminder of humility, letting you know that if you haven’t already lost someone or something close to your heart, the time will eventually come and you’ll have to find a way to deal with that loss, but also if you do find a way to cope, there’s a stronger chance that you’ll always find a way to cope.

Buy the book:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1797052225/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0

Glen can be found here:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bingbangbooks/
LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/bingbangbooks

 

About Dave Matthes

Writer and author of poetry and prose. Self-published author of eighteen books, with poetry published by Paper and Ink Zine, Analog Submission Press, and Hickathrift Press.
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